Emergency Tree Service

emergency serviceIndianapolis may not be in tornado alley, but we do experience our fair share of large summer storms.  Most of the time, these storms have heavy winds and rain that can wreak havoc on our trees and shrubs and may require emergency service.  It’s not uncommon for trees to lose many limbs, have lead branches break, or even have an entire tree uproot and crash down on a structure.

So, what should you do if a tree falls on your home?  That’s the exact question one of our customers asked himself after the last big storm.  Standing in his front yard, looking up at the massive tree that crashed through the side of his house, he was completely at a loss of what to do next.  Of course, he made sure everyone was safe, called 911, and then called his insurance company.  Their advice was to get the tree off the house immediately.  But how do you do that in the middle of the night?  The insurance agent suggested to call a company with Emergency Tree Service.

Our customer, who was unaware tree service companies even offered emergency services, was relieved he could get immediate help.  Not all tree service companies offer emergency service to residential and commercial properties, but Ping’s Tree Service does.  We work around the clock to handle any emergency tree service needed.  Our crews are on standby during every storm and are ready to help.  We have all the equipment to get your tree down quickly and safely, including a large crane to remove even the most massive tree in our service area.  So next time a storm blows through the Indianapolis area, don’t panic.  Simply call our office at 317-298-8482.  We’re here to help you make sure your property is once again safe after experiencing storm damage.

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Spring Has Sprung: Time for Planting Season

As the weather continues to warm up, property owners are getting ready to pick their favorite trees and get them planted during prime tree-planting season.  Spring is a great time to add new life to your landscape, and getting trees planted early can aid in their growth and survival throughout the year.  When choosing a tree specimen to plant, there are several factors to keep in mind.

Man and woman planting tree

Location.  How close will the tree be to a structure?  Do I need it for shade?  Will it attract birds to the area?  Will it enhance the overall appearance of the property?

Availability.  Are these trees readily available in the area?

Size.  How large will this specimen grow?  How much will it spread out?

Hardiness.  How will the tree stand up to the changes in temperature and conditions of the area?

Rate of Growth.  How fast will the tree grow?

Space.  How much room is available to allow the tree to grow naturally?  How much room does it need above and below ground?

Appearance.  Does the tree fit the landscape around it?  How will it look when fully matured?  What is the color and texture of the bark, flowers, foliage, fruit, etc?

Nourishment.  What are the moisture requirements for this specific specimen?  What type of fertilization is needed?

Maintenance.  What type of pruning will be needed to keep this tree looking its best?

Need help choosing your tree?  Our Certified Arborists are experts in tree selection and planting.  They analyze the area by considering soil conditions, presence of channelized winds, proximity to structures and other important factors to determine the tree specimen options that will best thrive and add curb appeal to your property.

Don’t forget to check your community restrictions and what is allowed by HOA’s and municipalities.  Also consider having the utilities marked on your property before getting your heart set on a particular location.  Call 811 for the national “Call Before You Dig” hotline to get assistance.


 

Tree Pruning for Property Managers is Prudent.

Proper tree pruning on any property helps breathe new life into the overall look of the landscape. It not only helps to maintain tree health, but it greatly adds to the appearance and appeal of the surrounding area. There are many reasons why property managers should consider having the trees on their managed properties pruned regularly. Here are a few of the most important ones.

Visibility.

Overgrown trees can block customers from seeing signs advertising the business or from viewing the property itself. This is where the property manager should take extra care to ensure all trees are trimmed accurately in order to provide as much visibility as possible.

overgrown parkinglotClearance around the building.

All too often, trees are planted too close to a building or structure. General tree trimming guidelines suggest a clearance of 5 to 10 feet of clearance. Property managers don’t want to have to continually be trimming back overgrown branches, so it’s a good thing to have a Certified Arborist put a tree pruning plan in place. A good plan will include pruning the entire tree, not just one side.

Parking.

Overgrown trees with low hanging branches can prevent the use of all available parking spots by making it impossible for a vehicle to access the space. Property managers want to keep those parking lot trees adequately pruned back so as to allow their customers plenty of room to park their cars and trucks. Having those trees regularly maintained can keep your lot looking nice and inviting to your patrons.

Ping’s Tree Service recommends contacting a Certified Arborist who can provide a professional evaluation of your trees and give recommendations on their individual needs. We currently have 7 Certified Arborists on our staff who are experts in all tree species, especially those located here in Indiana. We would love the opportunity to help you maintain the beauty of your managed properties.


 

Winter Is Coming!

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Fortunately we missed out on Winter Storm Jonas and the massive amounts of snow it dropped on the east coast. However, winter is not over yet. Even though we had a little warm up this week, meteorologists predict that February is going to be a very snowy month for us here in the Indianapolis area.

Winter storms and heavy snow can cause severe stress and damage to trees. If your trees experience damage from these types of storms, there are a few things for you to consider.

  1. Assess the Minor Damage. If your trees have acquired minor damage with only the smallest branches being injured, then generally there is no major threat to the tree. You may need to clean up the broken twigs and branches or have the crown thinned of bent or twisted limbs. But overall, the tree shouldn’t be in danger or distress.
  2. Asses the Major Damage. Tree damage that consists of large broken branches, missing bark that has been torn off, or trunks that are splintering can be signs of major damage and pose a risk to the health of your tree. That tree may require more maintenance or may need to be removed. A certified arborist is able to evaluate the health and safety of your tree in this situation.

 

Note: If it has been determined that the tree is not worth saving, have it removed as soon as possible. Leaving the tree to die can result in it becoming a hazard tree which increases the risk to yourself and the tree crew that will remove it. Increased risk requires special tools and techniques to safely remove the tree and will therefore increase the cost of the tree care work.

So whether it’s minor or major damage, take time to do a quick evaluation of your trees after a winter storm. If there is any damage, we’d love to help. Ping’s Tree Service offers a FREE Estimate on pruning, trimming, and tree removal services.


 

Recycling Your Christmas Tree 2016

christmas treeNow that the Christmas holiday has passed, it’s time to get your decorations put away and dispose of your Christmas tree. Recycling Christmas trees will provide mulch to the city parks for trails and landscaping to be used as needed. Here is a list of where you can get drop of your live, bare trees in and around the Indianapolis area:

Marion County

  • Broad Ripple Park (1610 Broad Ripple Ave.) south lot
  • Ellenberger Park (5301 E. St. Clair St.) west of pool in main parking lot
  • Garfield Park (2432 Conservatory Drive) MacAllister Center
  • Gustafson Park (3110 Moller Road) near the front entrance
  • Krannert Park (605 S. High School Road) north parking lot
  • Northwestway Park (5253 W. 62nd St.) near the recycling bins
  • Perry Park (451 E. Stop 11 Road) soccer field parking lot
  • Riverside Park (2420 N. Riverside Drive) tennis court parking lot
  • Sahm Park (6801 E. 91st St.) soccer field parking lot

Please note that from now until January 31, trees can be dropped off from dawn until dusk.

Note: DPW will NOT offer curbside Christmas tree pickup this year

Fishers (until Feb. 1, 2016)

  • ​Brooks School Park, 11780 Brooks School Road
  • Cumberland Park, 10580 Cumberland Road
  • Roy G. Holland Memorial Park, 1 Park Drive

Johnson County (until Feb. 11, 2016)

  • ​Center Grove High School, 2717 S. Morgantown Road, near the tennis courts
  • Johnson County Fairgrounds, 250 Fairground St., Franklin, near the Purdue Extension Office
  • Indian Creek Intermediate School, 1000 S. Indian Creek Dr., Trafalgar, near the teachers’ parking lot
  • McCarty Mulch, 100 Bluffdale, Greenwood
  • Curbside pickup will be offered in GREENWOOD through January.

Hendricks County (until Feb. 13, 2016)

  • ​Brownsburg Yard Waste Recycling Center, 90 Mardale Drive, Brownsburg
  • Plainfield Yard Waste Recycling Center, 7020 South CR 875 East, Plainfield
  • GreenCycle-McCarty, 494 South CR 200 E, Danville

Carmel and Westfield

Curbside Christmas tree pickup is available for free on your regular trash days.

♦ Once again, please make sure to remove all decorations, including your tree stand, before dropping off your tree.

♦ Also, it’s important to know that you should never burn your Christmas tree in a fireplace or wood stove. This may contribute to creosote buildup and could cause a chimney fire.


 

TCIA Professional Communications Awards Winner!

PCA 2013 WINNERSPing’s Tree Service is proud to announce it has been awarded a Professional Communications Award from the Tree Care Industry Association — TCIA. More than 20 years old, this program honors marketing and communication excellence within the tree care industry.

In August, we submitted our tree frog ads for entry into the TCIA Professional Communications Awards. These ads were created as part of our company branding initiative and have received a generous amount of positive responses in our advertising areas.

TCIA evaluated each entry on the overall appearance, content quality, adherence to American National Standards Institute and Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards, and its success in achieving the company’s marketing and communications goals.

To learn more about TCIA’s Professional Communications Award program, visit TCIA.org.

About the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA): Founded in 1938, TCIA is a public and professional resource on trees and arboriculture. It has more than 2,300 member companies who recognize stringent safety and performance standards and who are required to carry liability insurance. TCIA also has the nation’s only Accreditation program that helps consumers find tree care companies that adhere to industry standards for quality and safety; maintain trained, professional staff; and are dedicated to ethical and professional business practices. With access to the latest and best safety standards and training, the typical TCIA member company has 50% fewer accidents than a typical non-member.


 

Tree Topping . . . what is the alternative?

In our last blog we discussed several points on why tree topping is harmful to your trees. Trees that have been topped suffer starvation, shock, insect infestation, decay, weak limbs, and even death. There are no situations when we would ever recommend having your tree topped. So, what can you do instead of tree topping? Here’s what we recommend.

Canopy Reduction. This practice is the removal of small limbs from their point of origin. No more than 25% of the tree’s foliage should be removed, based on its species and health.

Crown-Raising-Before-AfterInterlimbing or Thinning. This method is best when you prefer your view to be through a tracery of green. Removing selected branches up the trunk provides partial views through the tree and will let more sunlight into your back yard if your trees were blocking it out. Thinning also creates paths for strong winds to move through the tree instead of pushing against them, allowing your tree to withstand those winds.

Raising the Canopy. This process opens up a view by removing the lower limbs of a tree. All branches are cut from the ground up to the desired level. These lower limbs give less energy for the tree’s growth, so the tree can tolerate their removal. To achieve a pleasing shape, be careful not to limb up higher than half the visual height of the tree. If the tree looks top heavy, you can thin out some of the higher branches.

Although these techniques are simple to understand, tree pruning can be dangerous and complicated and is best performed by a professional. To ensure your trees have an aesthetically pleasing shape, consult with a Certified Arborist and make sure to stay away from anyone who suggests tree topping as an option.


 

Tree Topping – Why it’s NOT recommended by your tree doctor

Any good tree service company will tell you that tree topping isn’t a good practice. Topping consists of drastically cutting back or removing large branches on mature trees. Not only does this leave the tree looking ugly, but it also causes severe damage to the tree’s health. Often times, homeowners feel their tree has grown too large for the space, or they fear their large tree could become a hazard during a strong storm. Tree topping is NOT the solution for several reasons.

1. Starvation.  Leaves produce starches during photosynthesis. The tree then moves these starches to the roots for storage and conversion into the much needed nutrients for the tree to grow and tree topping 1thrive. Tree topping, however, removes so much of the leafy crown that the tree may be unable to produce enough starch to properly nourish itself, leaving the tree to starve.

2. Shock.  The crown of the tree acts as a barrier between the hot summer sun and the bark of the tree. Removing a large portion of the crown exposes the bark to sun scald, shocking the tree with direct sunlight. This can result in poor health and even the death of your tree.

3. Insect and Disease.  Tree topping cuts can produce large wounds that are difficult to heal because of the location and size of the cuts. These open wounds on the stubs of the tree are a welcome mat to insect infestation and the spread of disease and decay fungi.

4. Weak Limbs.  New limbs that develop from the cuts grow only from that point on and are not an extension of the parent branch. Many times these new limbs are weakly attached to their parentlimb, with not more than an inch of wood.

5. Rapid New Growth.  Instead of controlling the height and spread of the tree, topping actually encourages rapid new growth. Trees respond to the cuts by sprouting many long limbs resulting in a taller and bushier tree.

6. Death.  Some tree species do not tolerate tree topping. They sprout only a few new limbs and therefore lack the leaves necessary to capture sunlight to produce glucose. Without this much needed nutrient, the tree simply dies.

7. Appearance.  Plain and simple, a topped tree is ugly. Even with the new growth, the tree will never regain its original beauty. It will no longer be a valuable asset to the surrounding landscape.

8. Price.  You need more than a ladder and a chain saw to properly prune a tree. Tree topping may be cheaper to accomplish, but the overall higher price will be reflected in the lowered property value, removal and replacement cost when the tree dies, declining health of nearby trees and shrubs reacting to the change in sunlight, liability risks from weak branches, and higher costs for future trimmings.

Want alternatives to Tree Topping? Check back for our next blog coming soon.


Preparing Trees For The Winter

WINTER IS COMING!! Before winter officially arrives, there are a few things you can do to prepare your trees for the hazardous weather.

plantingtreePlant the tree. Now is a great time to plant new trees in your yard, just make sure to get them planted prior to a hard freeze. That way they can enjoy the mild weather and frequent rainfall that help roots grow strong. You also want to mulch any new or established trees, but be careful to avoid volcano mulch (mulch piled high against the trunk of the tree).

PrunePrune the canopy.  Fall is a great time of year to have a certified arborist take look at the structure of your trees and make recommendations on how much to prune or trim. Proper pruning allows those brutal winter winds to pass through the trees which results in less breakage and damage, protecting your property.

Feed the roots.  Even during the winter months, your trees’ roots system continues to absorb nutrients until fertilizingthe ground is frozen. Fertilizing your trees helps them stay healthy during freezing temperatures and prepares them to return strong in the spring.

Spray the tree.  Applying dormant oil after insects have laid their eggs will stop insect larvae from developing further.       Come springtime, you’ll have less bugs chewing on your fresh tree buds and fruit. No Worries!! oil sprayDormant oils are less toxic to beneficial bugs and only remove the bad ones.

Need help winterizing your trees, contact us at [email protected] or call 317.298.8482

 


 

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